The Violet Palm

I have a confession to make.  Despite my love of all things green and leafy, historically I have been pretty hopeless with houseplants.  They are generally to be found looking slightly sad on windowsills around our home having been either over or under watered, under fed and left in their too small pots for too long (maybe ‘a sadness of houseplants should be the collective noun).  However, when one of my favourite local coffee shops announced they were taking over the unit next door to open a plant shop, naturally it piqued my interest.

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Why am I still doing exams at my age?!

Picture the scene: a visit to the beautiful Ness Botanic Garden, on the Wirral, on a pleasant morning in June. Baby safely installed with Daddy daycare. There bright and early with the whole day ahead to enjoy. Sounds marvellous doesn’t it? Just one problem: I’m there to sit exams for an RHS Level 3 qualification in Horticulture. So really, why am I doing this to myself?

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Sweet Sensations: Fragrance

A huge amount of emphasis in gardening is focussed on how plants and hard landscaping can be combined to make a space look good, using colour, form and texture.  However, incorporating features which engage other senses can be equally important in creating a garden which can be enjoyed year round.  Continue reading

Five handy books on growing your own

We have now had our allotment for almost six years, and even before that I had been growing edibles in containers in our small back garden for quite some time.  Whilst there is a plethora of information online about growing your own produce, you really can’t beat a good book for guiding you through the process.  The books highlighted in this blog are those I have found particularly interesting and useful (so far!). Continue reading

Lost Words, Lost Spaces

The recently released The Lost Words is a beautiful book which was developed following the decision to remove a number of words describing the natural world from the Oxford Junior Dictionary in favour of those deemed more contemporary. The book has rightly met with great acclaim as it seeks to re-engage children with descriptions of the flora and fauna many of us once took for granted. But it also prompts reflection on the loss not only of vocabulary, but also of access to the world which it describes for the increasing population of town and city dwellers. Continue reading