Our Tiny Garden: May 2020

#ourtinygarden2020

Buff-Tailed Bumble Bee
A Bumble Bee comes in to land on a Wallflower

May 2020 was another gloriously sunny month meaning the Spring of 2020 has been amazingly dry. Although it has meant a lot of watering in the garden, the weather has taken the edge off the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic with its various restrictions. I take part in a monthly photography challenge run by Jane Burkinshaw of Love Your Lens, where we post images related to particular a theme to a Facebook group for friendly critique. The theme for May was ‘nature’ and as such quite a lot of my photos of the garden this month were of birds and bugs and other beasts besides. I make no apology for this as an objective has been to attract more wildlife into our little patch and I’ve been delighted by the number of birds we have had visiting. It also gave me reason to practice a bit more with my macro lens.

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Planting Progress!

18 months ago, shortly after the birth of my son, I wrote a blog about my intention to redesign the planting in our tiny back garden. The best laid plans of mice and men! Of course in the general melee of life, parenting and the dreaded return to work, little of consequence occurred during 2018 to progress these grand plans. I did give some thought to the plants I might potentially like to use and did a spot of research into their characteristics and preferred conditions which at least helped to narrow things down. Quaint notions of fully developed planting plans however never materialised.

East Bed Before
East-facing bed November 2017

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Book Review: Wildlife Gardening

IMG_1764Although I have always enjoyed watching the wildlife that visits our small urban garden, my efforts in terms of deliberately choosing to include particular features for its benefit has, to date, been fairly erratic.  Having followed Kate Bradbury on social media for a while, I was keen to get hold of her new book, Wildlife Gardening for everyone and everything.  This a short review for the interest of those who would like to find out more about gardening for wildlife. Continue reading